Операционные системы

App permissions что это такое на планшете

App permissions что это такое на планшете

Request App Permissions

Every Android app runs in a limited-access sandbox. If an app needs to use resources or information outside of its own sandbox, the app has to request the appropriate permission. You declare that your app needs a permission by listing the permission in the app manifest and then requesting that the user approve each permission at runtime (on Android 6.0 and higher).

This page describes how to use the Android Support Library to check for and request permissions. The Android framework provides similar methods as of Android 6.0 (API level 23), but using the support library makes it easier to provide compatibility with older versions of Android.

Add permissions to the manifest

On all versions of Android, to declare that your app needs a permission, put a element in your app manifest, as a child of the top-level element. For example, an app that needs to access the internet would have this line in the manifest:

The system’s behavior after you declare a permission depends on how sensitive the permission is. Some permissions are considered „normal“ so the system immediately grants them upon installation. Other permissions are considered „dangerous“ so the user must explicitly grant your app access. For more information about the different kinds of permissions, see Protection levels.

Check for permissions

If your app needs a dangerous permission, you must check whether you have that permission every time you perform an operation that requires that permission. Beginning with Android 6.0 (API level 23), users can revoke permissions from any app at any time, even if the app targets a lower API level. So even if the app used the camera yesterday, it can’t assume it still has that permission today.

To check if you have a permission, call the ContextCompat.checkSelfPermission() method. For example, this snippet shows how to check if the activity has permission to write to the calendar:

If the app has the permission, the method returns PERMISSION_GRANTED , and the app can proceed with the operation. If the app does not have the permission, the method returns PERMISSION_DENIED , and the app has to explicitly ask the user for permission.

Request permissions

When your app receives PERMISSION_DENIED from checkSelfPermission() , you need to prompt the user for that permission. Android provides several methods you can use to request a permission, such as requestPermissions() , as shown in the code snippet below. Calling these methods brings up a standard Android dialog, which you cannot customize.

How this is displayed to the user depends on the device Android version as well as the target version of your application, as described in the Permissions Overview.

Explain why the app needs permissions

In some circumstances, you want to help the user understand why your app needs a permission. For example, if a user launches a photography app, the user probably won’t be surprised that the app asks for permission to use the camera, but the user might not understand why the app wants access to the user’s location or contacts. Before your app requests a permission, you should consider providing an explanation to the user. Keep in mind that you don’t want to overwhelm the user with explanations; if you provide too many explanations, the user might find the app frustrating and remove it.

One approach you might use is to provide an explanation only if the user has already denied that permission request. Android provides a utility method, shouldShowRequestPermissionRationale() , that returns true if the user has previously denied the request, and returns false if a user has denied a permission and selected the Don’t ask again option in the permission request dialog, or if a device policy prohibits the permission.

If a user keeps trying to use functionality that requires a permission, but keeps denying the permission request, that probably means the user doesn’t understand why the app needs the permission to provide that functionality. In a situation like that, it’s probably a good idea to show an explanation.

More advice about how to create a good user experience when asking for permission is provided in App Permissions Best Practices.

Request to become the default handler if necessary

Some apps depend on access to sensitive user information related to call logs and SMS messages. If you want to request the permissions specific to call logs and SMS messages and publish your app to the Play Store, you must prompt the user to set your app as the default handler for a core system function before requesting these runtime permissions.

For more information on default handlers, including guidance on showing a default handler prompt to users, see the guide on permissions used only in default handlers.

Request the permissions you need

If your app doesn’t already have the permission it needs, the app must call one of the requestPermissions() methods to request the appropriate permissions. Your app passes the permissions it wants and an integer request code that you specify to identify this permission request. This method functions asynchronously. It returns right away, and after the user responds to the prompt, the system calls the app’s callback method with the results, passing the same request code that the app passed to requestPermissions() .

The following code checks if the app has permission to read the user’s contacts. If it does not have permission it checks if it should show an explanation for needing the permission, and if no explanation is needed, it requests the permission:

The prompt shown by the system describes the permission group your app needs access to, not the specific permission.

Note: When your app calls requestPermissions() , the system shows a standard dialog box to the user. Your app cannot configure or alter that dialog box. If you need to provide any information or explanation to the user, you should do that before you call requestPermissions() , as described in Explain why the app needs permissions.

Handle the permissions request response

When the user responds to your app’s permission request, the system invokes your app’s onRequestPermissionsResult() method, passing it the user response. Your app has to override that method to find out whether the permission was granted. The callback is passed the same request code you passed to requestPermissions() . For example, if an app requests READ_CONTACTS access it might have the following callback method:

The dialog box shown by the system describes the permission group your app needs access to; it does not list the specific permission. For example, if you request the READ_CONTACTS permission, the system dialog box just says your app needs access to the device’s contacts. The user only needs to grant permission once for each permission group. If your app requests any other permissions in that group (that are listed in your app manifest), the system automatically grants them. When you request the permission, the system calls your onRequestPermissionsResult() callback method and passes PERMISSION_GRANTED , the same way it would if the user had explicitly granted your request through the system dialog box.

Note: Your app still needs to explicitly request every permission it needs, even if the user has already granted another permission in the same group. In addition, the grouping of permissions into groups may change in future Android releases. Your code should not rely on the assumption that particular permissions are or are not in the same group.

For example, suppose you list both READ_CONTACTS and WRITE_CONTACTS in your app manifest. If you request READ_CONTACTS and the user grants the permission, and you then request WRITE_CONTACTS , the system immediately grants you that permission without interacting with the user.

If the user denies a permission request, your app should take appropriate action. For example, your app might show a dialog explaining why it could not perform the user’s requested action that needs that permission.

When the system asks the user to grant a permission, the user has the option of telling the system not to ask for that permission again. In that case, any time an app uses requestPermissions() to ask for that permission again, the system immediately denies the request. The system calls your onRequestPermissionsResult() callback method and passes PERMISSION_DENIED , the same way it would if the user had explicitly rejected your request again. The method also returns false if a device policy prohibits the app from having that permission. This means that when you call requestPermissions() , you cannot assume that any direct interaction with the user has taken place.

To provide the best user experience when asking for app permissions, also see App Permissions Best Practices.

Declare permissions by API level

To declare a permission only on devices that support runtime permissions—that is, devices running Android 6.0 (API level 23) or higher—include the uses- permission-sdk-23 tag instead of the uses-permission tag.

When using either of these tags, you can set the maxSdkVersion attribute to specify that, on devices running a higher version, a particular permission isn’t needed.

Additional resources

For additional information about permissions, read these articles:

To learn more about requesting permissions, download the following sample apps:

  • Android RuntimePermissionsBasic Sample Java | Kotlin

Content and code samples on this page are subject to the licenses described in the Content License. Java is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates.

[:ru]Android runtime permissions пример реализации[:en]Android runtime permissions example implementation[:]

[:ru]В этом уроке мы рассмотрим, что такое запросы разрешений во время исполнения приложения и как с ними работать. Я покажу, как инициировать запрос разрешения, как обрабатывать ответы пользователя, а также что делать, если пользователь отказал в разрешении и установил флаг «больше не спрашивать» в диалоге запроса разрешения.

Кто не в теме, немного теории:

Как вы помните, до версии Android 6.0 все запрашиваемые разрешения отображались пользователю при установке приложения. И если пользователь не предоставлял приложению хотя бы одно разрешение из списка, приложение не устанавливалось.

Теперь все изменилось.

Начиная с Android API 23 разрешения поделили на обычные (normal) и опасные (dangerous).

Обычные разрешения — это те, которые не несут прямой угрозы конфиденциальности пользователя. К ним относятся разрешения на доступ к интернету и сетевым соединениям, доступ к беспроводным модулям, управлению оповещениями, звуком и т.д.

К опасным относятся разрешения на доступ к календарю, камере, контактам, местоположению, микрофону, звонкам, смс, датчикам, а также разрешение на чтение и запись данных во внешнюю память устройства.

Полный список обычных и опасных разрешений можно посмотреть по ссылке.

Во вторых, в связи с этим изменилось поведение приложений при установке, и здесь возможны варианты.

Например, рассмотрим случай, когда устройство работает под управлением Android версии 5.1 или ниже, или целевая версия SDK в файле сборки приложения имеет значение 22 или ниже.

При установке такого приложения все обычные разрешения, указанные в манифесте, будут предоставлены без запроса.
Если в манифесте есть опасное разрешение, то для его предоставления будет отображаться запрос пользователю. И если пользователь откажет, приложение не будет установлено.

Если же устройство работает под управлением Android 6.0 или выше, или целевая версия SDK установлена на 23 или выше, то приложение может быть установлено без запросов разрешений. Но при этом ему будут предоставлены только обычные, безопасные разрешения.

Опасные разрешения могут быть запрошены в момент работы приложения, когда пользователь попытается использовать функцию, для которой необходимо это разрешение. При этом пользователь может отказать в разрешении, и приложение спокойно продолжит работу с ограниченными функциями.

Теперь давайте рассмотрим пример работы с разрешениями на практике.

Это приложение с одной кнопкой, по нажатию которой создается папка в хранилище устройства, для чего приложению требуется разрешение на запись во внешнюю память.

Исходный код этого проекта вы можете посмотреть ниже:

В макете экрана одна кнопка.

Также нужен идентификатор для корневого view, это понадобится для работы снекбара.

Поскольку снекбар является компонентом библиотеки материального дизайна, добавьте ее в зависимости файла сборки модуля проекта.

Также нам понадобится разрешение на запись в память, пропишем его в манифесте.

Теперь рассмотрим код класса MainActivity.

Константа PERMISSION_REQUEST_CODE хранит произвольное значение, по которому в дальнейшем можно определить, на какой запрос разрешения вам пришел ответ.

Аналогично мы получали результат от activity, используя startActivityForResult, вспоминаем уроки по этой теме на нашем канале StartAndroid.

В методе onCreate создадим кнопку и присвоим ей слушатель нажатия.

В методе onClick проверяем логический результат метода hasPermissions, и вызываем метод создания папки, makeFolder. В этом методе мы просто создаем новый файл с именем fandroid и выводим несколько тостов с сообщениями, в зависимости от того, удалось или не удалось создать файл, или он уже создан.

Если же результат в методе onClick равен false, то вызываем метод requestPermissionWithRationale, который будет в свою очередь вызывать метод запроса разрешения. Мы перейдем к нему позже.

Ниже метод hasPermissions, который с помощью метода checkCallingOrSelfPermission в цикле проверяет предоставленные приложению разрешения и сравнивает их с тем, которое нам необходимо.

При отсутствии разрешения метод будет возвращать false, а при наличии разрешения — true.

В методе requestPerms создаем массив permissions , который содержит ссылки на константы класса Manifest с кодами разрешений. Поскольку используется массив, то одновременно можно запрашивать несколько разрешений.

После проверки версии устройства Запрос разрешения выполняет метод requestPermissions, которому мы передаем массив нужных нам разрешений и константу PERMISSION_REQUEST_CODE

После вызова этого метода пользователю отображается диалоговое окно с запросом разрешения.

Ответ пользователя приходит в метод onRequestPermissionsResult. Параметры requestCode и permissions содержат данные, которые вы передавали при запросе разрешений. Основные данные здесь несет массив grantResults, в котором находится информация о том, получены разрешения или нет. Каждому i-му элементу permissions соответствует i-ый элемент из grantResults.

Здесь мы обрабатываем ответ — проверяем, если разрешение предоставлено пользователем, о чем будет свидетельствовать ответ PERMISSION_GRANTED, то вызываем метод makeFolder, а если нет, то проверяем версию устройства,

и если она равна Андроид 6.0 или выше — проверяем, отказывался ли ранее пользователь предоставлять это разрешение. В таком случае метод с длинным названием shouldShowRequestPermissionRationale вернет нам true.

Одной из проблем может стать опция “Don’t ask again”, которая появляется при повторном запросе разрешения. При её выборе диалог запроса не будет больше появляться.

Метод shouldShowRequestPermissionRationale в таком случае будет возвращать false, а в onRequestPermissionsResult будет получен результат PERMISSION_DENIED — отказ в получении разрешения.

И останется единственный способ — попросить пользователя включить разрешение непосредственно через настройки приложения в разделе Permissions.

В этом случае мы будем вызывать метод showNoStoragePermissionSnackbar, в котором создаем Snackbar с кнопкой действия, ведущей в настройки разрешений приложения, и генерирующей тост для пользователя с инструкцией.

настройки открывает метод openApplicationSettings(), где мы создаем и отправляем соответствующий интент. В примере используются startActivityForResult и onActivityResult чтобы определить, что пользователь вернулся из activity настроек обратно в приложение и попробовать выполнить действие, которое нельзя было сделать без нужного разрешения.

Если вы ранее уже запрашивали разрешение, но пользователь отказался предоставить его, необходимо объяснить ему причину запроса.

это мы обыграем в методе requestPermissionWithRationale() — Запрос разрешения с обоснованием

Здесь также проверяем ответ метода shouldShowRequestPermissionRationale и если он true, создаем снекбар с сообщением для пользователя и кнопкой, по нажатию на которую будем вызывать метод получения разрешения.

Здесь же будет вызываться метод получения разрешения в случае первого запроса.

Теперь установим приложение на устройство и проверим его работу на эмуляторе с Андроид 6.0 (процесс тестирования смотрите в видео выше).

При нажатии кнопки появляется запрос разрешения.

Если пользователь отказал, то приложение продолжает работу, но папка не создается.

При повторном нажатии кнопки всплывает снекбар с объяснением необходимости предоставления запроса и кнопкой, при нажатии которой вновь отображается запрос.

Если же пользователь откажет снова и при этом выберет опцию «Не спрашивать больше», то при дальнейших попытках использования функции отображается снекбар с предложением открыть настройки и предоставить разрешение для приложения непосредственно в настройках.

После установки разрешения и возврата в приложение папка успешно создается.

На этом все. Вопросы задавайте в комментариях к уроку.[:en]In this lesson we will look at what the permission requests during the execution of the application and how to work with them. I’ll show you how to initiate a request for permission, how to handle the user’s answers and what to do if the user refused permission and planted the flag of «don’t ask» in the dialog asking permission.

In my life, a little theory:

As you remember, to Android 6.0, all the requested permissions is displayed to the user when the application is installed. And if the user does not provide the application to at least one solution from the list, the application could not be installed.

Now everything has changed.

Starting with Android 23 API permissions were divided into normal (normal) and hazardous (dangerous).

Regular permissions are those that are not a direct threat to user privacy. These include permissions to access Internet and network connections, access to wireless modules, management alerts, sound, etc.

Threat to include permissions to access calendar, camera, contacts, location, microphone, calls, SMS, sensors, as well as permission to read and write data to the external memory device.

Full list of normal and dangerous permissions, you can view the link.

Secondly, in connection with this changed the behavior of applications when you install, there may be options.

For example, consider the case when the device is running Android version 5.1 or lower, or target SDK version in the Assembly file of the application has a value of 22 or below.

When you install this app all the usual permissions specified in the manifest will be provided without prompting.
If the manifest is a dangerous permission to grant you will be prompted to the user. And if the user refuses, the application will not be installed.

If the device is running Android 6.0 or higher, or target SDK version set to 23 or higher, the application can be installed without your permission requests. But it received only conventional, safe solutions.

Dangerous permissions may be requested at the time of the application, when the user tries to use a feature that requires this permission. The user may refuse permission and the app will quietly continue to work with limited functions.

Now let’s look at an example of working with permissions in practice.

This application with one button which creates a folder in the storage device for which the app needs permission to write to external memory.

The source code of this project you can watch below:

Android 10 permissions: What’s new and how to use them!

Android 10 introduced a ton of new features but one of the most important features was the changes to the permission system. Permissions have come a long way on Android and it’s a lot better now than the archaic days where we used to give apps a dozen permissions before downloading them. We’ll take a look at all of the new Android 10 permissions features and how to access and change permissions on your phone. You can also check out our whole Android 10 review with the video above or as the written version here.

More posts about Android 10

We asked, you told us: Surprise surprise, most of you are running Android 10

Android OS problems and how to fix them

When should you expect to receive Android 10? (Updated March 20)

Which manufacturer updates its smartphones fastest: Android 10 rollout edition

Samsung Galaxy S20 Plus review: Buy this one

March 2020 security update lands on Galaxy Note 10

Android 10 Rules finally pushed out to (some) Google Pixel users

Samsung Galaxy Note 9 update: Android 10 now hitting T-Mobile models

Google accidentally posts Android 11 dev preview page, then takes it down

Here’s when your LG phone will see Android 10

New Android 10 permissions

Android 10 added a few additional layers on top of the existing permission system. Thus, most of the permission system is the same as Android 9.0 Pie. However, the additions over the top gives us more control and better privacy.

The first big change is the ability to allow Android 10 permissions only while an app is active. It’s mostly saved for sensitive permissions like microphone, location, and similar permissions. Thus, you can give an app like Facebook access to your location but only while the app is active in the foreground. Theoretically, Facebook wouldn’t be able to track your location while it’s not in use.

Android 10 is the most personalized version of Android yet.

Additionally, another new thing in Android 10 permissions is Scoped Storage. Basically, apps can only see the data in the folders they create. However, file browser apps are designed to view all the files on the device. Thus, Google makes you personally choose which folders a file browser can see in order to protect your privacy a little more.

The other changes involve shuffling around permissions and some other changes that mostly affect developers rather than us. You can view all of those changes on Android’s official developer website.

How to view and change Android 10 permissions

Now that we’re all on the same page, let’s learn how to view and change Android 10 permissions. First, let’s get to the proper section of the Settings menu to view Android 10 permissions and change them.

  1. Open Settings and navigate to Apps & notifications. From there, tap the Advanced option and then tap Permission Manager.
  2. You’ll see a list of all the various permissions on your phone. Select any one to view the apps with that permission on your device.
  3. Android 10 permissions have different categories. They are filed under Allowed or Denied. There is a third Allowed only while in use section for sensitive permissions like location or microphone.
  4. Change any permission by clicking on any app. You’re given a very simple Allow and Deny option. Select the one you want.

From there, you can adjust Android 10 permissions to your choosing. In fact, we highly recommend browsing through these menus to check out all the permissions your apps ask for and have access to. It’s actually quite easy and much more streamlined than it used to be.

Special app access controls

There is actually a second section for Android 10 permissions. Let’s get you to the proper spot and then we’ll tell you how to use the menu.

  1. Open Settings, navigate to Apps & notifications, and tap on the Advanced option to expand the menu.
  2. Click on the Special app access option.
  3. Select any category to view all of the apps with that special access. Unlike the regular Android 10 permissions section, this section only shows you apps with approved permission to use that feature. Thus, lists are a lot shorter and you may have categories with no apps listed.
  4. Select the app you want to remove permissions for.
  5. Tick the slider to the off position to remove the permission.

You’ll see a variety of categories such as Display over other apps, Do Not Disturb access, and Wi-Fi control. These are special Android 10 permissions that allow apps to do more than your standard permissions. Apps rarely ask for special app access and you’ll definitely notice if they do.

In general, you shouldn’t have to come into this section very often. You may need to remove antivirus apps from the Device Admin Apps section during an uninstall. However, by and large, you’ll likely never have to mess with this part of the menu.

Other tips and tricks

The methods above are the fastest and easiest methods to access Android 10 permissions. However, it’s not the only way. There are a few other things you can do to change or otherwise view permissions.

Alternate method to access Android 10 permissions:

  1. Open Settings and navigate to Apps & notifications. The top of that menu should have a section for Recently opened apps with a See all apps option. Click the See all apps option.
  2. You’ll see a list of all of your apps and games. Select the one you want to check out more.
  3. The next screen shows you all of the various options for that app. Click the Permissions option.
  4. This section shows you all of the permissions that app can use and whether or not those permissions were approved or denied.
  5. You can click on any permission to change it from approved to denied or vice versa.

That method functions as a different alternative in case you only want to deal with a specific app rather than every app. Additionally, you can do things like force close, wipe cache, and view data usage for the app through that menu.

Alternative method to open the Permission Manager:

  1. Open Settings and navigate to the Privacy settings.
  2. The Permission manager is the first option there. To be honest, this may be an easier way to access Android 10 permissions and you can use either this method or the other one if you want to. They both take you to the same screen.

Finally, there is one more section that controls Google-specific data collection from your various apps.

Change Google data collection from your apps and games:

  1. Open Settings and navigate to the Privacy section.
  2. There are two sections in the Privacy options to control Google data collection. They are Google location history and Activity controls.
  3. Google location history takes you to Google’s Location History page. Simply tick the box on or off to enable or disable the feature.
  4. Activity controls has a lot more stuff. You can enable or disable Google’s ability to collect web and app activity, location history, and YouTube history. The ad personalization settings are also available here with the ability to turn those on and off as well.
  5. You can also enable or disable sending anonymous diagnostic data with the Usage & diagnostics section in the Privacy settings menu.

With everything above, you should be able to fine tune your privacy and permissions as you see fit. However, if you want even more granular controls, we also recommend trying out Bouncer, an app that removes permissions as soon as you’re done using the app. It works well with existing Android 10 permissions.

app permissions

1 permissions

2 permissions

3 permissions

4 Object Permissions

5 Permissions property

6 Permissions Tab

7 user permissions

  1. полномочия пользователя

полномочия пользователя

[Л.Г.Суменко. Англо-русский словарь по информационным технологиям. М.: ГП ЦНИИС, 2003.]

8 permissions

  1. разрешения
  2. права доступа

права доступа
Описание типа разрешенных взаимодействий, который может выполнить объект при помощи данного ресурса. Например, читать, писать, исполнять, добавлять, изменять и удалять. (МСЭ-Т Х.1141).
[ http://www.iks-media.ru/glossary/index.html?glossid=2400324]

права доступа
Перечень разрешенных действий и сетевых ресурсов, которые при работе с данной системой могут быть доступны конкретному пользователю.
[Л.М. Невдяев. Телекоммуникационные технологии. Англо-русский толковый словарь-справочник. Под редакцией Ю.М. Горностаева. Москва, 2002]

  • автоматизированные системы
  • электросвязь, основные понятия

разрешения
Информация, связанная с каждым каталогом и/или файлом, к которым предоставляется ограниченный доступ.
[ http://www.lexikon.ru/dict/net/index.html]

9 Macintosh-style permissions

10 access permissions

11 printer permissions

12 share permissions

13 Fine-Grained Permissions

14 access permissions

15 assign permissions to users

16 auditing permissions

17 file permissions

18 object permissions

19 permissions

20 permissions assigning

См. также в других словарях:

Permissions UNIX — Les permissions UNIX constituent un système simple de définition des droits d accès aux ressources, représentées par des fichiers disponibles sur un système informatique. Elles restent le moyen le plus utilisé pour définir les droits des… … Wikipédia en Français

Repair permissions — Repairing disk permissions is a troubleshooting activity commonly associated with the Mac OS X operating system.OverviewThe BSD layer in Mac OS X (and Darwin) is responsible for filesystem security, including the management of the Unix (POSIX)… … Wikipedia

Android (operating system) — Android … Wikipedia

Droit unix — Permissions Unix Les permissions UNIX constituent un système simple de définition des droits d accès aux ressources, représentées par des fichiers disponibles sur un système informatique. Elles restent le moyen le plus utilisé pour définir les… … Wikipédia en Français

Droits Unix — Permissions Unix Les permissions UNIX constituent un système simple de définition des droits d accès aux ressources, représentées par des fichiers disponibles sur un système informatique. Elles restent le moyen le plus utilisé pour définir les… … Wikipédia en Français

Permission unix — Permissions Unix Les permissions UNIX constituent un système simple de définition des droits d accès aux ressources, représentées par des fichiers disponibles sur un système informatique. Elles restent le moyen le plus utilisé pour définir les… … Wikipédia en Français

Mobile operating system — A mobile operating system, also known as a mobile OS, mobile software platform or a handheld operating system, is the operating system that controls a mobile device or information appliance similar in principle to an operating system such as… … Wikipedia

Comparison of file systems — The following tables compare general and technical information for a number of file systems. Contents 1 General information 2 Limits 3 Metadata 4 Features … Wikipedia

Mac OS X — OSX redirects here. For other uses, see OSX (disambiguation). Mac OS X … Wikipedia

Mobile application development — is the process by which application software is developed for small low power handheld devices such as personal digital assistants, enterprise digital assistants or mobile phones. These applications are either pre installed on phones during… … Wikipedia

Chmod — The chmod command (abbreviated from change mode) is a shell command in Unix and Unix like environments. When executed, the command can change file system modes of files and directories. The modes include permissions and special modes. History A… … Wikipedia

Android 10 permissions: What’s new and how to use them!

Android 10 introduced a ton of new features but one of the most important features was the changes to the permission system. Permissions have come a long way on Android and it’s a lot better now than the archaic days where we used to give apps a dozen permissions before downloading them. We’ll take a look at all of the new Android 10 permissions features and how to access and change permissions on your phone. You can also check out our whole Android 10 review with the video above or as the written version here.

More posts about Android 10

We asked, you told us: Surprise surprise, most of you are running Android 10

Android OS problems and how to fix them

When should you expect to receive Android 10? (Updated March 20)

Which manufacturer updates its smartphones fastest: Android 10 rollout edition

Samsung Galaxy S20 Plus review: Buy this one

March 2020 security update lands on Galaxy Note 10

Android 10 Rules finally pushed out to (some) Google Pixel users

Samsung Galaxy Note 9 update: Android 10 now hitting T-Mobile models

Google accidentally posts Android 11 dev preview page, then takes it down

Here’s when your LG phone will see Android 10

New Android 10 permissions

Android 10 added a few additional layers on top of the existing permission system. Thus, most of the permission system is the same as Android 9.0 Pie. However, the additions over the top gives us more control and better privacy.

The first big change is the ability to allow Android 10 permissions only while an app is active. It’s mostly saved for sensitive permissions like microphone, location, and similar permissions. Thus, you can give an app like Facebook access to your location but only while the app is active in the foreground. Theoretically, Facebook wouldn’t be able to track your location while it’s not in use.

Android 10 is the most personalized version of Android yet.

Additionally, another new thing in Android 10 permissions is Scoped Storage. Basically, apps can only see the data in the folders they create. However, file browser apps are designed to view all the files on the device. Thus, Google makes you personally choose which folders a file browser can see in order to protect your privacy a little more.

The other changes involve shuffling around permissions and some other changes that mostly affect developers rather than us. You can view all of those changes on Android’s official developer website.

How to view and change Android 10 permissions

Now that we’re all on the same page, let’s learn how to view and change Android 10 permissions. First, let’s get to the proper section of the Settings menu to view Android 10 permissions and change them.

  1. Open Settings and navigate to Apps & notifications. From there, tap the Advanced option and then tap Permission Manager.
  2. You’ll see a list of all the various permissions on your phone. Select any one to view the apps with that permission on your device.
  3. Android 10 permissions have different categories. They are filed under Allowed or Denied. There is a third Allowed only while in use section for sensitive permissions like location or microphone.
  4. Change any permission by clicking on any app. You’re given a very simple Allow and Deny option. Select the one you want.

From there, you can adjust Android 10 permissions to your choosing. In fact, we highly recommend browsing through these menus to check out all the permissions your apps ask for and have access to. It’s actually quite easy and much more streamlined than it used to be.

Special app access controls

There is actually a second section for Android 10 permissions. Let’s get you to the proper spot and then we’ll tell you how to use the menu.

  1. Open Settings, navigate to Apps & notifications, and tap on the Advanced option to expand the menu.
  2. Click on the Special app access option.
  3. Select any category to view all of the apps with that special access. Unlike the regular Android 10 permissions section, this section only shows you apps with approved permission to use that feature. Thus, lists are a lot shorter and you may have categories with no apps listed.
  4. Select the app you want to remove permissions for.
  5. Tick the slider to the off position to remove the permission.

You’ll see a variety of categories such as Display over other apps, Do Not Disturb access, and Wi-Fi control. These are special Android 10 permissions that allow apps to do more than your standard permissions. Apps rarely ask for special app access and you’ll definitely notice if they do.

In general, you shouldn’t have to come into this section very often. You may need to remove antivirus apps from the Device Admin Apps section during an uninstall. However, by and large, you’ll likely never have to mess with this part of the menu.

Other tips and tricks

The methods above are the fastest and easiest methods to access Android 10 permissions. However, it’s not the only way. There are a few other things you can do to change or otherwise view permissions.

Alternate method to access Android 10 permissions:

  1. Open Settings and navigate to Apps & notifications. The top of that menu should have a section for Recently opened apps with a See all apps option. Click the See all apps option.
  2. You’ll see a list of all of your apps and games. Select the one you want to check out more.
  3. The next screen shows you all of the various options for that app. Click the Permissions option.
  4. This section shows you all of the permissions that app can use and whether or not those permissions were approved or denied.
  5. You can click on any permission to change it from approved to denied or vice versa.

That method functions as a different alternative in case you only want to deal with a specific app rather than every app. Additionally, you can do things like force close, wipe cache, and view data usage for the app through that menu.

Alternative method to open the Permission Manager:

  1. Open Settings and navigate to the Privacy settings.
  2. The Permission manager is the first option there. To be honest, this may be an easier way to access Android 10 permissions and you can use either this method or the other one if you want to. They both take you to the same screen.

Finally, there is one more section that controls Google-specific data collection from your various apps.

Change Google data collection from your apps and games:

  1. Open Settings and navigate to the Privacy section.
  2. There are two sections in the Privacy options to control Google data collection. They are Google location history and Activity controls.
  3. Google location history takes you to Google’s Location History page. Simply tick the box on or off to enable or disable the feature.
  4. Activity controls has a lot more stuff. You can enable or disable Google’s ability to collect web and app activity, location history, and YouTube history. The ad personalization settings are also available here with the ability to turn those on and off as well.
  5. You can also enable or disable sending anonymous diagnostic data with the Usage & diagnostics section in the Privacy settings menu.

With everything above, you should be able to fine tune your privacy and permissions as you see fit. However, if you want even more granular controls, we also recommend trying out Bouncer, an app that removes permissions as soon as you’re done using the app. It works well with existing Android 10 permissions.

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